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Volume 52, Number 2, April 2019

Comparison of clinical characteristics of bacteremia from Elizabethkingia meningoseptica and other carbapenem-resistant, non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli at a tertiary medical center 


Ying-Chi Huang, Ping-Feng Wu, Yi-Tsung Lin, Fu-Der Wang


 

Background and purpose: 

Acquired carbapenem resistance among non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB), such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ACB complex), is a serious problem in nosocomial infections. We previously reported that patients infected with the intrinsically carbapenem-resistant Elizabethkingia meningoseptica were associated with high mortality. However, little information is available regarding the clinical outcome of E. meningoseptica bacteremia when compared to that of other carbapenem-resistant NFGNB.Acquired carbapenem resistance among non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB), such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ACB complex), is a serious problem in nosocomial infections. We previously reported that patients infected with the intrinsically carbapenem-resistant Elizabethkingia meningoseptica were associated with high mortality. However, little information is available regarding the clinical outcome of E. meningoseptica bacteremia when compared to that of other carbapenem-resistant NFGNB. 



 

Methods:

We conducted an observational study that included consecutive patients with E. meningoseptica, carbapenem-resistant ACB complex, carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia at a Taiwanese medical center in 2015. We compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes between patients with E. meningoseptica bacteremia and those with other carbapenem-resistant NFGNB bacteremia. 



 

Results:

We identified 30 patients with E. meningoseptica, 71 with carbapenem-resistant ACB complex, 25 with S. maltophilia, and 17 with carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia. The clinical characteristics, disease severity, and previous antibiotic exposures were similar between patients with bacteremia either due to E. meningoseptica or other carbapenem-resistant NFGNB. Patients with E. meningoseptica bacteremia had a higher rate of appropriate empirical antibiotics than those with other carbapenem-resistant NFGNB and was less associated with central venous catheterization. The 28-day mortality rates were similar between patients with E. meningoseptica and the other carbapenem-resistant NFGNB bacteremia (46.7% vs 46%, p = 0.949). 



 

Conclusion:

The mortality rate of E. meningoseptica bacteremia was as high as other carbapenem-resistant NFGNB infections. The emerging E. meningoseptica infection calls for active surveillance and continued awareness from clinical physicians for this serious carbapenem-resistant infection. 



 

Key words:

Bacteremia Carbapenem resistance Elizabethkingia meningoseptica MortalityNon-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli