Print E-mail
Volume 50, Number 6, December 2017

Clinical manifestations in uveitis patients with and without rheumatic disease in a Chinese population in Taiwan 


Shi-Ting Tseng, Tsung-Chieh Yao, Jing-Long Huang, Kuo-Wei Yeh, Yih-Shiou Hwang


 

Corresponding author:

Yih-Shiou Hwang, Corresponding authors. Kuo-Wei Yeh, Division of Pediatric Allergy, Asthma and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 5 FU-Hsin Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Yih-Shiou Hwang, Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 5, FU-Hsin Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan. 



 

Background and purpose: 

Uveitis can be a local eye disease or a manifestation of systemic rheumatologic disorders. However, the differences of clinical manifestations between uveitis patients with or without systemic rheumatologic disease have been seldom described in literature. We investigated the clinical features and complications of rheumatic disease-related uveitis, and compared the characteristics in patients with and without rheumatic disease in a Chinese population in Taiwan. 



 

Methods:

A retrospective review was performed for all patients who had been diagnosed with uveitis between January 2009 and June 2014 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. 



 

Results:

A total of 823 uveitis patients were enrolled in the study, including 123 patients with rheumatic diseases. The most frequent rheumatic diseases included ankylosing spondylitis (5.8%), followed by Behçet's disease (2.8%), sarcoidosis (1.4%), psoriasis (1.1%), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (1.1%). Compared with patients without rheumatic disease, those with rheumatic disease-related uveitis had a lower mean age at onset (35.1 ± 15.8 years vs. 44.0 ± 17.5 years), a longer follow-up period (27.1 ± 25.3 months vs. 22.2 ± 23.0 months), a higher incidence of anterior uveitis (69.0% vs. 46.3%), less frequent posterior uveitis (4.9% vs. 21.4%), a higher incidence of recurrence (26.8% vs. 14.1%), more frequent bilateral involvement (53.7% vs. 38.8%), and more frequent posterior synechiae (17.2% vs. 9.4%). 



 

Conclusion:

The disease course and clinical manifestations of rheumatic disease-related uveitis were different from those unrelated. Patients with rheumatic disease-related uveitis had a higher recurrent rate and more frequent posterior synechiae than patients without rheumatic diseases. 



 

Key words:

autoimmune disease, epidemiology, rheumatic disease, uveitis