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Volume 50, Number 3, June 2017

An investigation of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration creep among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pediatric patients and healthy children in Northern Taiwan 


Chia-Ning Chang, Wen-Tsung Lo, Ming-Chin Chan, Ching-Mei Yu, Chih-Chien Wang


 

Corresponding author:

Chih-Chien Wang, Corresponding author. Department of Pediatrics, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, 325 Cheng-Kung Road, Sector 2, Neihu, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC. 



 

Background and purpose: 

The phenomenon of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) creep is an increasingly serious problem in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. In this study, we investigated the vancomycin and daptomycin MIC values of MRSA strains isolated from pediatric patients and MRSA colonized healthy children. Then, we assessed whether there was evidence of clonal dissemination for strains with an MIC to vancomycin of ≥ 1.5 μg/mL.

 



 

Methods:

We collected clinical MRSA isolates from pediatric patients and from healthy children colonized with MRSA during 2008–2012 at a tertiary medical center in northern Taiwan and obtained vancomycin and daptomycin MIC values using the Etest method. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec) typing were used to assess clonal dissemination for strains with an MIC to vancomycin of ≥ 1.5 μg/mL. 



 

Results:

A total 195 MRSA strains were included in this study; 87 were isolated patients with a clinical MRSA infection, and the other 108 strains from nasally colonized healthy children. Vancomycin MIC≥1.5 μg/mL was seen in more clinical isolates (60/87, 69%) than colonized isolates (32/108, 29.6%), p < 0.001. The PFGE typing of both strains revealed multiple pulsotypes. 



 

Conclusion:

Vancomycin MIC creeps existed in both clinical MRSA isolates and colonized MRSA strains. Great diversity of PFGE typing was in both strains collected. There was no association between the clinical and colonized MRSA isolates with vancomycin MIC creep. 



 

Key words:

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type of MRSA, Vancomycin creep