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Volume 49, Number 3, June 2016

Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in female outpatients, 2009–2013 


Qing-Yong Wang, Rong-Hai Li, Lu-Qing Zheng, Xiao-Hong Shang


 

Corresponding author:

Corresponding author. Xiao-Hong Shang, Department of Clinical Laboratory, Xiyuan Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100091, China. 



 

Background and purpose: 

The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis among female outpatients treated for genital infection at a Chinese hospital from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013. 



 

Methods:

Samples from 6051 female outpatients were analyzed using Mycoplasma Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (ID/AST).

 



 

Results:

The overall prevalence of U. urealyticum was higher than the prevalence of single M. hominis infection (31.2% vs 0.7%) and coinfections (31.2% vs. 1.9%). The percentage of U. urealyticum and/or M. hominis detected in the 30–39 year age group was greater than in the other age groups. More than 94.6% of the U. urealyticum isolates, 100% of the M. hominis isolates, and 84.3% of the isolates from coinfections were susceptible to doxycycline, minocycline, and tetracycline. More than 69.2% of the U. urealyticum isolates were susceptible to azithromycin, erythromycin, clarithromycin, and roxithromycin, but > 95.6% of the M. hominis isolates and 89.6% of the isolates from coinfections were resistant to these antibiotics. Acetylspiramycin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin were inactive against more than one-half of the isolates. More than 75.6% of the M. hominis isolates were susceptible to spectinomycin, but > 87.1% of the U. urealyticum and 93.3% of the coinfection isolates were resistant to this antibiotic. Isolates from three coinfections were completely resistant to the 14 antibiotics.

 



 

Conclusion:

The determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of these mycoplasma species is often crucial for optimal antimicrobial therapy of infected outpatients. 



 

Key words:

antibiotic susceptibility, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum