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Volume 46, Number 3, June 2013

Relationship of teicoplanin MICs to treatment failure in teicoplanin-treated patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia 


Ke-Yuan Chen, Hong-Jyun Chang, Po-Chang Hsu, Chien-Chang Yang, Ju-Hsin Chia, Tsu-Lan Wu, Ching-Tai Huang, Ming-Hsun Lee


Received: April 9, 2012    Revised: June 14, 2012    Accepted: September 20, 2012   

 

Corresponding author:

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan
Corresponding author. Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Shin Street, Gueishan 333, Taoyuan, Taiwan. 



 

Background and purpose: 

The objective of this study was to determine the predictive value of teicoplanin minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for treatment failure among patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia.
 



 

Methods:

In this study, all patients with ≥1 tracheal aspirates or sputum cultures positive for MRSA admitted to the hospital between April 2011 and September 2011 were reviewed. We enrolled patients who are ≥18 years of age, with a diagnosis of pneumonia, and with a receipt of teicoplanin therapy throughout the course. The relationship between teicoplanin Etest MICs and treatment outcomes of MRSA pneumonia was analyzed to identify the breakpoint of teicoplanin MICs influencing treatment outcomes. 



 

Results:

Of the 80 patients enrolled, 31 had a lower teicoplanin MIC level (<2.0 mg/L) and 49 had a higher MIC level (≥2.0 mg/L) for MRSA. The lower MIC group had a higher clinical resolution rate in 14 days [24 (77.4%) vs. 23 (46.9%), p = 0.007] and a lower treatment failure rate at the end of teicoplanin treatment [4 (12.9%) vs. 18 (36.7%), p = 0.020]. A comparison between the treatment success and failure groups showed that the former had a longer duration of teicoplanin use (18.76 ± 10.34vs.12.41 ± 5.65 days; p = 0.014). Results of a multivariate analysis showed that teicoplanin MICs ≥ 2.0 mg/Land shorter duration of teicoplanin therapy were independent risk factors for treatment failure. 



 

Conclusion:

A higher teicoplanin MIC value (≥2.0 mg/L) may predict the treatment failure among patients with teicoplanin-treated MRSA pneumonia. 



 

Key words:

MRSA, Pneumonia, Teicoplanin