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Volume 46, Number 1, February 2013

Analysis of serum total IgE, specific IgE and eosinophils in children with acute and chronic urticaria

 


Kai-Lin Chang, Yao-Hsu Yang, Hsin-Hui Yu, Jyh-Hong Lee, Li-Chieh Wang, Bor-Luen Chiang


Received: May 18, 2011    Revised: October 13, 2011    Accepted: November 17, 2011   

 

Corresponding author:

Bor-Luen Chiang, Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 7 Chung-Shan South Road, Taipei, Taiwan. 



 

Background and purpose: 

Increased IgE and eosinophil levels are frequently observed in cutaneous inflammation and are thought to provoke the occurrence of urticaria. However, the relationship of these factors with the disease duration of urticaria remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare serum total IgE levels, specific IgE sensitization rates and eosinophil percentages between acute and chronic urticaria in children.



 

Methods:

A total of 165 patients (104 with acute and 61 with chronic urticaria) from a tertiary referral hospital were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of total IgE, prevalence of sensitization to food and aeroallergens and blood eosinophil percentages were compared by the disease duration of urticaria.There were no statistical differences in total IgE production, positive sensitization to specific allergens and eosinophil percentages between the patients with acute and chronic urticaria. There is a higher prevalence of sensitization to aeroallergens than food allergens in children with urticaria. In terms of gender, males had significantly higher serum IgE levels than females. 



 

Results:

There were no statistical differences in total IgE production, positive sensitization to specific allergens and eosinophil percentages between the patients with acute and chronic urticaria. There is a higher prevalence of sensitization to aeroallergens than food allergens in children with urticaria. In terms of gender, males had significantly higher serum IgE levels than females. 



 

Conclusion:

Boys potentially have a higher serum IgE expression than girls children with urticaria. IgE levels and eosinophil percentages are not good indicators for a prolonged course of urticaria. The prevalence of sensitization to aeroallergens was significantly higher than that of food allergens in children with urticaria. Routine laboratory analysis for common allergens is not appropriate, and it could be a feasible approach to detect a predilection for atopy when respiratory infections are causative factors of urticaria occurrence. 



 

Key words:

Acute, Chronic urticaria, Eosinophil percentage, Immunoglobulin E (IgE), Specific immunoglobulin E (IgE)