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Volume 38, Number 4, August 2005

Epidemiologic trends in nosocomial bacteremia in a neonatal intensive care unit


Sung-Hsi Wei, Hsiu-Hui Chiu, Kuo-Chen Hung, Jen-Hsian Wang, Bai-Horng Su, Hung-Chih Lin, Tsung-Wen Lin, Hsiao-Chuan Lin
Department of Pediatrics and Section of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan

Received: August 10, 2004    Revised: October 4, 2004    Accepted: December 4, 2004   

 

Corresponding author:

Dr. Hsiao-Chuan Lin, Department of Pediatrics, China Medical University Hospital, 2 Yuh Der Road, Taichung 404, Taiwan. E-mail: b7901041@yahoo.com.tw This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 



 

Methods:

The primary goal of this study was to analyze the epidemiologic features of nosocomial bloodstream infection (NBSI) in a neonatal intensive care unit over a 7-year period. All neonatal patients with NBSI treated from January 1997 to December 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. 232 NBSI episodes were diagnosed in 208 patients. The average NBSI patient-day rates were 4.69 and 2.59 per 1000 patient-days in 1997-1999 and 2000-2003, respectively. The average NBSI rates were 5.00 and 1.50 per 1000 patient days in neonates <1500 g and >1500 g, respectively. The proportion of Gram-positive organisms increased from 24% in 1997-2001 to 41% in 2002-2003, whereas the proportion of Gram-negative isolates decreased from 65% in 1997-2001 to 47% in 2002-2003. The implementation of measures for the prevention of nosocomial infection was associated with the reduction of NBSI rates. Low birth weight was demonstrated to be a significant risk factor for NBSI. The fact that Gram-positive organisms were isolated in increasing frequency may impact on the appropriate selection of empiric antimicrobial therapy for NBSI in the neonatal intensive care unit.

 



 

Key words:

Bacteremia, cross infection, low birth weight infant, neonatal intensive care units, risk factors



 



 

J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2005;38:283-288.