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Volume 39, Number 3, June 2006

Risk factors for central venous catheter-related infections in general surgery


Huan-Sheng Chen, Fu-Der Wang, Man Lin, Yi-Chun Lin, Ling-Ju Huang, Chen-Yi Liu
Department of Medicine, Li-Shin Hospital, Taoyuan; Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University of Medicine, Taipei; Department of Infection Control, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei; and Department of Medicine, Taichung Hospital, Department of Health, The Executive Yuan, Taipei, Taiwan

Received: May 17, 2004    Revised: November 30, 2004    Accepted: August 25, 2005   

 

Corresponding author:

Fu-Der Wang, Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, No. 201, Sec. 2, Shih-Pai Road, Taipei, Taiwan. E-mail: fdwang@vghtpe.gov.tw This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 



 

Background and purpose: 

Central venous catheter (CVC) infection is a common problem during hospitalization and nosocomial bloodstream infection in these patients is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and health care cost. This prospective study examined the risk factors of CVC-related infections.

 



 

Methods:

During a 6-month period, a total of 281 patients who underwent central venous catheterization after general surgery were enrolled.

 



 

Results:

The mean duration from CVC insertion to the development of infection was 7.12 days. The rate of bloodstream infection without isolation of the same organism from the catheter was 1.4% (4/281). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection was 6.0% (17/281). The rate of catheter bacteremia, defined as positive culture from a catheter blood sample in a patient without signs of infection, was 8.5% (24/281). The incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection was 7.5/1000 catheter-days. Risk factors for catheter-related infection on univariate analysis included place of insertion (operating room or surgical ward), total parenteral nutrition (TPN), more than 3 tubings, and duration of catheterization. TPN was a significant risk factor in the logistic regression analysis.

 



 

Conclusion:

Established infection control guidelines should be rigorously observed with regard to catheter use and various risk factors controlled to prevent the occurrence of CVC-related infection, especially in patients receiving TPN.

 



 

Key words:

Bacteremia, central venous catheterization, infection control, risk factors, surgery


 



 

J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2006;39:231-236.