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Volume 39, Number 4, August 2006

Occupational blood and infectious body fluid exposures in a teaching hospital: a three-year review


Wen-Bin Hsieh, Nan-Chang Chiu, Chun-Ming Lee, Fu-Yuan Huang
Department of Pediatrics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei; Department of Pediatrics, Ten-Chen Hospital, Yang-Mei; and 3Department of Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Received: August 2, 2005    Revised: August 19, 2005    Accepted: August 30, 2005   

 

Corresponding author:

Dr. Nan-Chang Chiu, Department of Pediatrics, Mackay Memorial Hospital , No. 92, Section 2, Chung-Shan North Road , Taipei , Taiwan . E-mail: ncc88@ms2.mmh.org.tw This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it



 

Background and purpose: 

Blood and infectious body fluid (BBF) exposures are common safety problems for health care workers (HCWs). We analyzed reported BBF exposures during a 3-year period at a teaching hospital.

 



 

Methods:

We collected reports of BBF exposures among HCWs occurring from January 2001 to December 2003 at a 2000-bed tertiary care medical center in northern Taiwan . HCWs were requested to report BBF exposures immediately after each exposure, which required completing a report sheet of questions concerning the exposure. The HCW was also required to visit an infectious diseases specialist who would decide on the appropriate management in each case.

 



 

Results:

Needlestick injuries were the most commonly reported BBF exposure, accounting for 80% of reported cases. The total incidence density of BBF exposures was 1.96 per 100 person-years. BBF exposures were most common in December and least common in September. Nurses had the highest percentage (60.6%) of BBF exposures and other job categories including physicians, technicians, cleaning staff, and interns accounted for around 10% each. Injuries occurred most commonly during the daytime (57.0%). Three-quarters (74.9%) of the injured HCWs had appropriate immediate care. Interns had the highest incidence density (4.48 per 100 person-years) of BBF exposures and technicians the lowest (0.50 per 100 person-years). Among the exposed HCWs, 1 received hepatitis B vaccine, 1 received both hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis B immune globulin, 1 received zidovudine/lamivudine due to a needlestick injury when treating an HIV-positive patient, and 4 received penicillin due to exposure to syphilis. No HCW developed infections after BBF exposure during the study period.

 



 

Conclusion:

Measures which may be effective in reducing BBF exposures include education of HCW, increased use of standard precautions, improved administrative support, and enhanced reporting of BBF exposures.

 



 

Key words:

Blood-borne pathogens, body fluids, first aid, hospital personnel, infection control, occupational health

 



 

J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2006;39:321-327.