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Volume 39, Number 5, October 2006

Disseminated, fatal Trichosporon asahii infection in a bone marrow transplant recipient


Seyed Amir Ghiasian, Amir Hossein Maghsood, Seyed Hossain Mirhendi
Medical Parasitology and Mycology Department, School of Medicine, Hamedan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Hamedan; and Medical Parasitology and Mycology Department, School of Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Tehran, Iran

Received: March 20, 2006    Revised: April 20, 2006    Accepted: May 10, 2006   

 

Corresponding author:

Seyed Amir Ghiasian, Medical Parasitology and Mycology Department, School of Medicine, Hamedan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Hamedan 65155-518, Iran. E-mail: s.a.ghiasian@umsha.ac.ir This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 



 

Methods:

Trichosporon asahii is the most important species regularly isolated from systemic mycoses and shows a predilection for hematogenous dissemination. This report describes the first fatal case of disseminated trichosporonosis caused by T. asahii in a patient with familial aplastic anemia (AA). An 11-year-old girl with familial AA received chemoradiotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy for bone marrow transplantation. She was neutropenic and suffered from fever, cough, and severe mouth ulcers. T. asahii was repeatedly demonstrated by appropriate morphological and physiological characteristics, i.e., arthroconidium formation, urease activity, and assimilation of carbon and nitrogen compounds. T. asahii was found in samples of sputum, nose, and mouth ulcers by direct microscopy and culturing. Furthermore, postmortem histopathology study revealed vast tissue invasion of fungal hyphae characteristic of Trichosporon in the lung and liver. Disseminated trichosporonosis should be suspected in immunocompromised patients when a febrile condition does not improve after prolonged treatment with broad-spectrum parenteral antibiotics.

 



 

Key words:

Bone marrow transplantation, fungemia, mycoses, Iran, Trichosporon



 



 

J Microbiol Immunol Infect2006;39:426-429.