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Volume 40, Number 4, August 2007

Fifteen-year experience of children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura in southern Taiwan, 1991-2005


Bao-Ren Nong, Yung-Feng Huang, Chih-Ming Chuang, Chia-Chia Liu, Kai-Sheng Hsieh
Department of Pediatrics, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Received: September 2, 2005    Revised: July 20, 2006    Accepted: September 15, 2006   

 

Corresponding author:

Dr. Yung-Feng Huang, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, No. 386 Ta-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung 813, Taiwan. E-mail: brnong@yahoo.com.tw This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 



 

Background and purpose: 

Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common cause of systemic vasculitis in children, long-term and large-scale Taiwanese studies on HSP are rare. We reviewed the records of 107 Taiwanese pediatric patients diagnosed with HSP at our institution between 1991 and 2005.

 



 

Methods:

The first clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and outcome evaluations of the patients were analyzed. Data were grouped according to the presence of fever and upper respiratory tact infection (URI) as a presenting symptom and also by gender. Chi-squared test was used for statistical analysis.

 



 

Results:

The children had a mean age of 6.2 ± 2.5 years (range, 2 to 13 years), with a male-to-female ratio of 1.0:0.7. Main clinical symptoms included skin rashes (95.3%), gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (72.0%), joint involvement (46.7%), and kidney involvement (28.0%). The most common first manifestations were skin rashes (56.1%), GI symptoms (35.5%), and joint involvement (12.1%). There was no significant association between first manifestations and fever presence or gender. However, the non-URI patients had a significantly higher incidence of GI problems than the URI group (p=0.01). Fever as a symptom was not associated with elevation of C-reactive protein (p=0.45). Immunoglobulin A levels were within the normal range. No chronic renal failure or end-stage renal disease was detected, and overall the prognosis of patients was good.

 



 

Conclusion:

The categories used did not predict the expression of HSP, with the exception of an association between absence of URI and GI manifestations. Overall, HSP showed a good prognosis.

 



 

Key words:

Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Retrospective studies; Risk factors


 



 

J Microbiol Immunol Infect. 2007;40:371-376.