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Volume 40, Number 4, August 2007

Immune response to ovalbumin following bisphenol A administration in mice fed with a low level of dietary protein


Mohammad Alizadeh, Fusao Ota, Afework Kassu
Department of Preventive Environment and Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan

Received: October 5, 2006    Revised: February 10, 2007    Accepted: March 15, 2007   

 

Corresponding author:

Prof. Fusao Ota, Department of Preventive Environment and Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan. E-mail: ota@nutr.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 



 

Background and purpose: 

We have previously shown that bisphenol A (BPA) augments T-helper (Th) 1 activity with no significant effects on an established oral tolerance to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice fed with a normal protein diet. The present study aimed to examine the effect of BPA on the immune response in a mouse model maintained on a very low protein diet (5% casein).
 



 

Methods:

Mice were fed on a 5% protein diet, together with either OVA (OVA-fed) or water (water-fed), immunized intraperitoneally with OVA at 3-week intervals and administered BPA between the 2 immunizations. A week after the last immunization, animals were sacrificed and examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serum titers of total immunoglobulin E (IgE), OVA-specific IgE, immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG1, IgG2a, and the production of interferon-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-12.

 



 

Results:

In both BPA-treated and non-treated animals, OVA feeding resulted in lower titers of total and OVA-specific IgE, and OVA-specific IgG (p<0.05). There were higher levels of interferon-gamma (p<0.05), IL-4, and IL-12 (p<0.05) in animals with OVA tolerance following BPA treatment. However, IL-12 production was augmented only in BPA-treated water-fed animals (p<0.01).

 



 

Conclusion:

BPA administration in mice fed with a low level of dietary protein augmented Th1 cytokines more profoundly in the animals with OVA tolerance than in the non-tolerant animals.

 



 

Key words:

Bisphenol A; Food hypersensitivity; Immunoglobulin E; Ovalbumin


 



 

J Microbiol Immunol Infect. 2007;40:364-370.